Res Musica

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Res Musica

"As a teenager addicted to his phone, Lawrence Brownlee is remarkably natural in the role of Ernesto. One will never sufficiently underline the elegance of this singer, too rare on Parisian stages. All is fluid, linked, clear and direct, with beautiful colors that aptly translate the emotions of adolescence."

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Toute la Culture

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Toute la Culture

"A true revelation in this Don Pasquale, Lawrence Brownlee enchants us throughout the opera and even in a teenager's sweatshirt and cap he moves us with "Povero Ernesto!" as well as the distant "Com'e gentil a Notte," sung backstage."

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Opera Online

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Opera Online

“The American tenor Lawrence Brownlee is an Ernesto with a warm and soft timbre...he excels in his serenade.”

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Olyrix

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Olyrix

“Lawrence Brownlee is an Ernesto with clear high notes, exalted in a full voice and soft in a mixed voice. The timbre is rich and warm, notably in the medium and the neat legato. When low, the timbre is full-bodied and pleasant. His light vibrato maintains a contained and regular rhythm. His phrasing most often shows his courage, but he's able to become delicate in his duo with Nadine Sierra.”

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Concert Classic

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Concert Classic

"For his part, Lawrence Brownlee constitutes the evening's lovely surprise, Ernesto propelled by a delightful, diaphanous di grazia tenor voice."

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Daily Herald

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Daily Herald

“His artistic presentation, emotional face and unbeatable charm complemented the beautiful tone and amazing range of his voice. Brownlee impressed the audience with his long, high notes, especially at the triumphal ending of the aria. What a great high C!”

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Broadway World

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Broadway World

“The warmth and vibrancy of his voice fit the needs of the music exquisitely [in the Dichterliebe]…in [Cycles] the singer absolutely commanded the stage and sounded gorgeous even in the most dissonant sections.”

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Berkshire Fine Arts

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Berkshire Fine Arts

“A new Brownlee emerged as he sung these songs. A brilliant edge was added to the lovely lyricism of the voice we have come to know. Anguish, desperation, and sadness are all painted in his darker tones, often richly textured in the lower registers.”

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WNYC

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WNYC

Internationally acclaimed bel canto tenor Lawrence Brownlee discusses his Black Lives Matter-inspired song cycle called Cycles of My Being. Brownlee collaborated with two other black artists, composer Tyshawn Sorey and poet Terrance Hayes to create the piece.

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Broadway World

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Broadway World

When tenor Lawrence Brownlee--he of the sweet, cultured tones and ringing high Cs-Ds, and higher--was first asked to put a recital together by Carnegie Hall, he was pretty certain of the centerpiece: Robert Schumann's "Dichterliebe (A Poet's Love)," the elegant 19th century song cycle about rapture, disillusionment and regret.

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Boston Classical Review

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Boston Classical Review

"Indeed, there may be no better or more agile bel canto tenor on the scene today than Brownlee...the singer commands a stellar technique and honeyed tone that makes his high notes ring with characteristic warmth."

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San Francisco Chronicle

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San Francisco Chronicle

“The cycle’s six songs, which run about 35 minutes altogether, are arranged in three elaborately matched concentric pairs, whose traversal feels like a descent into a maelstrom followed by the emergence out the other side….Brownlee was an ideal interpreter of this music, his bright and unclouded vocal tone allowing access to both the intimacy and public force of the writing.”

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NPR All Things Considered

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NPR All Things Considered

The experiences of black men in America today are making their way onto the classical concert stage, thanks to internationally acclaimed tenor Lawrence Brownlee. Brownlee enlisted the help of two other prominent African-American artists, composer Tyshawn Sorey and poetTerrance Hayes.

The three hope that the work, called Cycles of My Being, will open some eyes. Brownlee is touring the song cycle across the U.S. in the coming weeks, including a performance at New York's Carnegie Hall.

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The Boston Globe

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The Boston Globe

On paper, the duo program that tenor Lawrence Brownlee and bass Eric Owens bring to Jordan Hall on April 7 is a fairly typical affair: some operatic highlights from each man’s repertoire in the first half, and a selection of traditional spirituals, popular songs, and gospel numbers in the second.

A curious thing about the program, though, is that, read the right way, it neatly outlines the improbable journey by which Brownlee, an African-American who grew up in a blue-collar family in Youngstown, Ohio, has become one of the most admired bel canto singers of his day.

That journey begins in church, with the gospel songs that close out the concert. It was in the church choir that Brownlee’s father directed, and where his mother was a soloist, that he got his start singing. His talent was apparent early on, and he would later credit the astonishing flexibility of his voice, so crucial in bel canto, to the gospel “riffs or runs” he heard and practiced from an early age.

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San Francisco Chronicle

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San Francisco Chronicle

Brownlee decided to work with Sorey after hearing Bullock sing the Baker suite and checking out his work as an adventurous jazz composer. Confronted by a steady stream of headlines and video of black men being mistreated, he knew he wanted to bring the defiant energy of the Black Lives Matter movement into the concert hall, and with its sudden dynamic shifts and startling harmonic leaps “Being” can be confrontational. But the six-part, 40-minute work is more an invitation than a polemic, hinging on Hayes’ question, “Do you love the air in me as I love the air in you?”

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KQED Arts

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KQED Arts

“The first song," he told me by phone from a concert hall in Munich, Germany, "is called 'Inhale. Exhale.' And the question we pose in the lyrics: 'America, do you love the air in me as we love the air in you.'

For the Philadelphia premiere of 'Cycles of My Being', Brownlee was joined by Violinist Randall Mitsuo Goosby, pianist Kevin Miller, cellist Khari Joyner, clarinetist Alexander Laing, and composer Tyshawn Sorey (Courtesy of Opera Philadelphia)

"Myself, I am very patriotic," Brownlee continued. "My father served in the military. I have an uncle who died in the Vietnam war, but the fact is we are treated very differently than other Americans. When the Constitution and the Bill of Rights was written, it didn’t have people like me in mind. And when someone like me is pulled over by a police officer, I will be treated differently than a person with blue eyes and blond hair."

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Chicago Tribune

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Chicago Tribune

"Rare are the classical singers who use their celebrity cachet to help generate new repertory. One shining example is Lawrence Brownlee, who regards the commissioning of music by living composers and sharing it with audiences around the world an essential part of who he is as a performing artist.

Even so, his involvement with “Cycles of My Being,” the new song cycle he included in his recital Thursday night at the DuSable Museum of African American History, was motivated by something much deeper, something much more personal: Brownlee and his collaborators, composer Tyshawn Sorey and poet Terrance Hayes, wanted to express their feelings, and, crucially, how they are perceived, as African-American men living in a racially divided America."

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Broad Street Review

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Broad Street Review

"Cycles of My Being demonstrates the searching quality that sets Brownlee apart from many of his contemporaries.

Throughout the cycle Brownlee proves himself a keen textual interpreter, performing with a commitment not only to the words and notes but to the ideas behind them.

His artistry is undeniable."

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Philly Inquirer

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Philly Inquirer

"And then the piece ends suddenly and quietly. Here is an existential question delivered in a small moment, and the sensation of a larger meaning coming into focus with a musical gesture felt startlingly familiar.

It was like Schubert. But of now, and us."

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Philly Inquirer

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Philly Inquirer

"The poet who wrote the words can be confrontational. The composer is known for cutting-edge jazz. The singer specializes in ornately written operas from another century. Suffice it to say that Cycles of My Being, a new song cycle by poet Terrance Hayes and composer Tyshawn Sorey — prompted by police brutality against African Americans — won’t be anything typical. Or demure.

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